Home > User Experience > UI/UX Design: Usability Theory & The Banjo Effect | by Nick Lawrence | Jan, 2021

UI/UX Design: Usability Theory & The Banjo Effect | by Nick Lawrence | Jan, 2021

UI/UX Design: Usability Theory & The Banjo Effect | by Nick Lawrence | Jan, 2021


Usability theory is a little more direct, it states that:

The solution that is the most usable for the user within their given context will be given mental priority by the user.

This gives us a huge leg up, but what constitutes good usability? There are several approaches that we need to consider.

The most convenient product will will 99 times out of 100. Stores are getting killed right now by Amazon because its service designers have made it so easy and convenient to use that it is next to impossible not to use it.

Laziness will almost always win out over any other form of motivation. The desire to save time, energy, and psychological/emotional resources (even if it means spending just a little bit more money) is the lever that moves the immovable user.

Most of the time you can’t fix a bias, but you can exploit it to make your product easier to use for the user.

This has to do with the user feeling that your product or service is mirroring what and how they already feel inside. By aligning your designs with the aesthetic presentations, interactions, and overall tone that your user is expecting or favors, you immediately gain ground and traction with that user.

Human eye is drawn to novelty, motion, size, and color in roughly that order. By making it exceedingly obvious what the user should do next without outright telling them, you give them the ability to feel like they were the ones who figured it out.

Your users will buy into your product much more readily because it not only gets them where they want to go, but it makes them feel like a more competent human being in the process.

If you make an action attractive, and offer an immediate reward for doing it, a user is far more likely to complete that action.

Furthermore, if you introduce variable rewards throughout the process, and make it a novel but ultimately positive experience, your engagement and retention will increase dramatically.



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