Home > User Experience > Generate Crazy Ideas With This Design Sprint Method | by Eric Chung | Jul, 2020

Generate Crazy Ideas With This Design Sprint Method | by Eric Chung | Jul, 2020

Generate Crazy Ideas With This Design Sprint Method | by Eric Chung | Jul, 2020


Set up

Every person should have one piece of paper folded into 8 sections. Alternatively, you can use sticky notes instead.

Start the clock

With eight minutes on the clock, all team members should silently sketch out eight different ideas based on your How Might We statements. The goal of the exercise is to push past your least innovative ideas and get your creative juices flowing.

Remember not to focus on the features or specific technology of your solution. Instead of worrying about the implementation, a good idea should describe the experience a user might have with the solution.

After each minute, prompt your team to start a new idea to keep them on pace. The emphasis should be on quantity, rather than quality, so reassure them that their sketches don’t have to be perfect.

The more ideas you can come up with, the closer you will get to finding the best one to solve your problem. (Source: IBM Enterprise Design Thinking Practitioner Course)

Playbacks

After the eight minutes are up, it’s time for playbacks. Each person should share their ideas with the rest of the team. This should only take a few minutes per person.

Vote

Once everyone has shared their ideas, put the sketches up on a wall. Using voting dots or stickers, each person should vote for their top three ideas that they think could potentially be a viable solution to the How Might We statements. The goal here is to weed out ideas that definitely would not work.

Cluster

Looking at all the ideas, some may be similar or complementary to one another. Group these by physically moving them close to each other and name the clusters. From here, continue to discuss these ideas in more detail and plot them on to a Prioritization Grid to narrow down the ones your team could move forward with.

Decide your next move by focusing on the intersection of importance and feasibility. (Source: IBM Enterprise Design Thinking Toolkit)



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