Home > User Experience > Adaptive Learning Management System for Hearing-Impaired Children — a UX Case Study | by Gianna Burgos | Nov, 2020

Adaptive Learning Management System for Hearing-Impaired Children — a UX Case Study | by Gianna Burgos | Nov, 2020

Adaptive Learning Management System for Hearing-Impaired Children — a UX Case Study | by Gianna Burgos | Nov, 2020


Before beginning the entire process, we started off by conducting research on the current learning curriculum and methods used by specialized teachers to teach the children in the Philippines.

Source: Department of Education Curriculum and Instruction Strand

We tried to look for similar learning platforms online that cater to this community.

In the end, our team has confirmed that there are tools to supplement these platforms (voice-to-text recognition, etc) but still no existing platform as such online. We also identified the reasons why such a tool still does not exist.

For Hearing-Impaired Students (conducted using Sign Language):

  • What do you enjoy most about school?
  • How do you learn best?
  • Was it hard to make friends?
  • How would you describe your ideal teacher?
  • What are the daily struggles you find most annoying?
  • Suppose you are watching a video, is it more convenient to have the dialogues signed or captioned?
  • Are there any mobile applications you find most difficult to use? What about it?

For Special Education Development (SPED) Teachers:

  • Do you have a reward system for these students?
  • What is the greatest challenge you have faced while teaching them?
  • What difficulties do students face while learning remotely (esp during COVID-19)?
  • Have you ever used any web or mobile apps to assist your teaching delivery?
  • If you were to create an app to teach the children, what functionalities would you add?

“Filipino Sign Language is the new norm. American Sign Language has become a traditional way of communicating in the Philippines.” — SPED Professor

“Visual aids help us understand words and phrases more such as pictures and emojis.” — Student

We created a user persona to represent our hearing-impaired child users. I used this persona as a direction to meet the primary users’ needs throughout the design process.



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